amari-no-kokoro

annaxbeth:

Hahahaha this is me.

(Source: lilybaeum, via thirtycans)

october 19, 2014

long yellow

jordanconductor:

Watch: http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=wJelEXaPhJ8

my life is complete

normal conversations with normal friends: korra edition

october 15, 2014

dying from the outside in

october 15, 2014

the cat delay

“'What's new?' is an interesting and broadening eternal question, but one which, if pursued exclusively, results only in an endless parade of trivia and fashion, the silt of tomorrow. I would like, instead, to be concerned with the question 'What is best?', a question which cuts deeply rather than broadly, a question whose answers tend to move the silt downstream.”

—   Robert M. Pirsig, from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (via anthonymoll)
akinogapress:

so close

akinogapress:

so close

dailydot:

Gorgeous animation illuminates the science of animal flight
Humans dreamed about flying for hundreds (thousands!) of years before we came up with a way to launch ourselves into the sky. But animals figured it out through the process of evolution in varied and stunning ways. While human flight requires some extra hardware we can always appreciate the flapping, gliding, and buzzing solutions in nature.
Designer Eleanor Lutz created this stunning animated infographic that shows the wingbeats of five different species: a fruit bat, a hawk moth, a Canada goose, a hummingbird, and a dragonfly.
The dragonfly’s asynchronous double wings are especially cool. The work was partly inspired by Lutz’s experience during undergrad working in an insect lab. “I helped out with an experiment about mosquito larvae,” she writes. “As part of the process we used a Matlab program to manually input the larva’s location during thousands of video frames.”
[Read more]

dailydot:

Gorgeous animation illuminates the science of animal flight

Humans dreamed about flying for hundreds (thousands!) of years before we came up with a way to launch ourselves into the sky. But animals figured it out through the process of evolution in varied and stunning ways. While human flight requires some extra hardware we can always appreciate the flapping, gliding, and buzzing solutions in nature.

Designer Eleanor Lutz created this stunning animated infographic that shows the wingbeats of five different species: a fruit bat, a hawk moth, a Canada goose, a hummingbird, and a dragonfly.

The dragonfly’s asynchronous double wings are especially cool. The work was partly inspired by Lutz’s experience during undergrad working in an insect lab. “I helped out with an experiment about mosquito larvae,” she writes. “As part of the process we used a Matlab program to manually input the larva’s location during thousands of video frames.”

[Read more]

(via nkt08)

akinogapress:

SEWN’d

akinogapress:

SEWN’d